Mandurah to Dawesville

We woke up at 8am. Our genial host had tea with us in her back yard.

20170420_093416

We walked down the street to the town centre, stopping at the supermarket for supplies.

DSC01675

We had to cross over an old bridge.

DSC01679

There are fishing platforms installed at either end under the bridge, which you access via stairs from the footpath.

DSC01676

There is a new bridge being built next to it.

DSC01678

I was surprised to see that the old bridge was supported by massive wooden beams.

DSC01677

After that, I read the map carefully and plotted a path through parkland so that we wouldn’t be walking on the street much.

DSC01680DSC01681DSC01682

DSC01683DSC01684

DSC01685

This led us to a conservation park – a long strip of bushland next to the Peel inlet.

DSC01688DSC01689

DSC01690DSC01691

The view opened up.

DSC01693

We came next to a jetty where three pelicans rested on wooden poles in the water.

DSC01694

We then walked on a bitumen path through parkland.

DSC01695DSC01697

And then we cut across to the ocean side. We arrived at Falcon Bay, a delightful spot to have some lunch at an old fashioned style Australian beach cafe and a swim. We enjoyed ourselves so much we stayed for 2 hours.

DSC01700DSC01698

DSC01699

We walked along the coastal path.

DSC01701DSC01702DSC01703DSC01704

And arrived at Port Bouvard, which is one of Mandurah’s artificial marinas. This one includes an artificial island which has an impressive, almost mediaeval looking gatehouse on its bridge.

DSC01705

From around the corner, it looked like a modernised version of Venice.

DSC01707

There was pleasant parkland,

DSC01706

and as we headed back towards the Peel inlet, we reached a high point, where you get a 360 degree view of the area.

DSC01710

DSC01708

Then we arrived at the cut, a canal cut through the land to provide a second link between the ocean and the inlet to enable the water to flow between them better. There are walkways underneath the road on either side of the bridge. We saw dolphins jumping in the water, but I didn’t manage to get a photo of them.

DSC01711DSC01712DSC01713

On the other side we walked alongside the road for a short while before crossing into a bushland reserve.

DSC01714DSC01715DSC01716

We headed back to the inlet side and walked along the shore for a while….

DSC01717

…before cutting inland again through parks….

DSC01718

and then we arrived at the shops in Dawesville.

DSC01720DSC01721

We had timed it perfectly since the bus back to Mandurah station arrived only a couple of minutes later.

DSC01722DSC01723

The sun was setting as we crossed back over the bridge across the cut.

DSC01725

And that was that. 160km of coast walked over 6 days.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s